Martin Ten Hoeve aka Lampi, the 202cm tall Dutch wave rider, had a kind of comeback on the PWA tour after a foot injury. He qualified for the main event in Sylt and seems to have recovered from his foot injury which happened at the PWA event in Klitmøller in 2015. Besides his little comeback on tour, he changed his equipment sponsors as well. We hooked up with Lampi to speak about his latest news.

Martin Ten Hoeve on a wave free sailing trip at the Baltic Sea

Martin Ten Hoeve on a wave free sailing trip in Gislövshammar, Sweden (Pic: Sara Sandahl Christensen)

 

Continentseven: Congrats you made it through the trials in the World Cup in Sylt recently. Happy about it?

Martin Ten Hoeve: Yes, thanks for that. Well trials are kinda always hard because they often get pushed trough, in conditions that are maybe not so good, so that makes me more nervous.

Continentseven: You were a bit off the tour, what’s your impression on the current level on tour?
Martin Ten Hoeve:
The level is improving each year, but I do think that the guys who have the double moves in their bags have easier heats. In Sylt it was different. You could see that it was harder for everyone to land any double moves. The guys, who normally are able to land double moves all the time could not show them as the wind was too light!

Martin Ten Hoeve made it through the trials in Sylt 2016 (Pic: Carter/PWA)

Martin Ten Hoeve made it through the trials in Sylt 2016 (Pic: Carter/PWA)

 

Continentseven: How hard was it to keep the level during periods off the tour?
Martin Ten Hoeve:
Not too hard I think. All the moves I can do are still in my system, but to progress is harder and that counts for all the riders.

Continentseven: You are an extremely tall and heavy rider. What’s your smallest board (volume) you use?
Martin Ten Hoeve:
I have a 86 liter board, but that’s pretty much for the big storms. Otherwise I choose floating to come through the wind holes, above smaller boards.

Continentseven: So, you windsurf with bigger boards compared to all other riders. Isn’t it harder to carve turns and jump with that ships?
Martin Ten Hoeve:
No, I think these days it’s not hard at all anymore on those big ships. I show that in all my videos using mainly big boards. Fins change also a lot. The asymmetrical fins I got of K4 help!

Martin Ten Hoeve on a thick wave

Martin Ten Hoeve on a thick wave in Gislövshammar, Sweden (Pic: Sara Sandahl Christensen)

 

Continentseven: You have new equipment partners. Tell us more about it.
Martin Ten Hoeve:
Yeah super happy with my new sponsor Simmerstyle. I got a complete deal with them. I was already stoked about the sails when I was testing for Boardseeker few years ago. With jumping I had so much control on that sails. About the boards I was not sure yet as I was stoked about my old board sponsor, so I needed to try the boards before I made that decision. Simmerstyle made me a proto quantum 115L what I tried in dead onshore and side shore wind and I got surprised there. It feels more loose and still plans as early as the other boards. Friends of mine said they could see that my original wave ride style came back more, what is a really nice compliment.

Continentseven: You were quite a while on Goya/Point-7! What was the reason for that change?
Martin Ten Hoeve:
I found a better match with Simmerstyle and I never got my 10 years anniversary cake…

Continentseven: What are your next goals?
Martin Ten Hoeve:
This year I focused all my energy on getting fit again after my injury and that opened up to make my body even more strong because then I can step my level up. During this year I was playing around with my wave ride style to improve it.

Martin Ten Hoeve shares the waves with team mate Ben Proffitt

Martin Ten Hoeve shares the waves with team mate Ben Proffitt (Pic: Sara Sandahl Christensen)

©continentseven.com 2016, Pics: Sara Sandahl Christensen